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UNESCO Aschberg Bursaries for Artists

The UNESCO-Aschberg Bursaries for Artists Programme has announced the 2013 call for Applications. This call is open to musicians, visual artists and creative writers between 25 years and 35 years old.

Since its creation in 1994, UNESCO-Aschberg Programme advocates and promotes creativity, highlights cultural exchanges and the need for artists to enrich their experience through contact with other cultures. The Programme promotes the mobility of young artists through art residencies abroad so as to foster creativity and cultural diversity. It recognizes the important contribution of artists in the creative process and their central role in nurturing the diversity of cultural expressions.

Candidates are invited to submit their applications directly to institution of their choice. The application deadline for each institution UNESCO-Aschberg bursary varies from one institution to another. The majority of the deadlines are set from the mid-October to the end of November. For exact dates please check the residency of your choice.The list of partner institutions and requirements needed to apply is available on the UNESCO-Aschberg bursaries website

Please review the prize's FAQ page and candidate information page before considering an application.

The Programme strategy is based in UNESCO’s policies to promote creativity and cultural diversity, and so, converges with the goals of the Convention on the Promotion and Protection of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions (2005 Convention)

The institutions will pre-select three candidates for each bursary and submit them to UNESCO together with their applications files. A panel makes the final selection taking into consideration the priorities of the residency, geographical distribution and gender equality.

Note that the Programme gives priority to artists and institutions in developing countries, in order to enhance North-South and South-South cooperation.

Written: 04/10/2012 , last modified: 04/10/2012



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