Castles and Town Walls of King Edward in Gwynedd kick off World Heritage 30th anniversary celebrations

Castles and Town Walls of King Edward in Gwynedd Photograph Visit Wales

2016 marks the 30th anniversary of UNESCO World Heritage in the UK.

Throughout 2016, St. Kilda, Giant’s Causeway and Causeway Coast, Durham Castle and Cathedral, Ironbridge Gorge, Studley Royal Park (including the ruins of Fountain Abbey), Stonehenge, Avebury and Associated Sites and the Castles and Town Walls of King Edward in Gwynedd will each be marking 30 years since they were inscribed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites at the 10th session of the World Heritage Committee in Paris in November 1986.

The Castles and Town Walls of King Edward in Gwynedd World Heritage Site is getting a head start on its own anniversary celebrations which will kick off in late February and early March. These first events will include opportunities to learn more about the significance of UNESCO World Heritage status and a chance to participate in arts-based activities with local artist Menna Thomas. The anniversary events and initiatives are open to all and will continue throughout 2016.

Comprised of the castles of Beaumaris and Harlech and the fortified complexes of Caernarfon and Conwy, the Castles and Town Walls of King Edward are among the finest examples of late 13th century and early 14th century military architecture in Europe. According to the Site’s statement of Outstanding Universal Value: “The castles of Beaumaris and Harlech are unique artistic achievements for the way they combine characteristic 13th century double-wall structures with a central plan, and for the beauty of their proportions and masonry.” The Castles and Town Walls of King Edward World Heritage Site is now one of the major references of medieval history and a popular tourist attraction in northern Wales.

30th anniversary celebrations are set to take place across the UK throughout 2016 at each of the UK’s original seven World Heritage Sites.

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